Clinics

Clinics

Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic

The Pediatric Traumatic Brian Injury (TBI) Clinic's primary purpose is to assist children who have developed physical, cognitive, and behavioral impairments as a result of traumatic brain injury. Dr. Stephen Ashwal, the clinic director, has over 30 years of clinical practice in pediatric neurology and is internationally recognized for his expertise in the field of pediatric TBI. Teresa Serna is the clinic's nurse practitioner and has over 15 years experience with TBI.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Muscular Dystrophy Clinic

The Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) Clinic at Children's Hospital has been caring for patients with neuromuscular disorders for over 30 years. The most common disorders seen include Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, and myotonic dystrophy. This clinic is directed by Dr. David Michelson. There is also a focus on the orthopedic and rehabilitation needs of children with these disorders while working closely with rehabilitation medicine and organizations such as California Children's Services.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic

The Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic at Children's Hospital provides care for children and adults with tuberous sclerosis, a multi-system disorder that frequently affects brain function, causing seizures, learning disabilities, and behavioral problems. Other commonly affected organs include the kidneys, lungs, heart, and skin. The clinic meets weekly. All patients receive a comprehensive evaluation by Dr. Stephen Ashwal, Clinic Director.

For questions or appointments for the Tuberous Sclerosis Clinic, contact TSC Coordinator Holly Bernardi, RN directly at (909) 835-1825.

Mitochondrial Disorders Clinic

Mitochondrial disorders are the most common type of inborn error of metabolism and can cause a wide range of problems including failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, weakness, muscle cramps, fatigue, hearing loss, visual loss, loss of balance and coordination, seizures, and learning delays. The Mitochondrial Disorders Clinic at Children's Hospital cares for children with diagnosed or suspected mitochondrial disorders, providing assistance and guidance with testing and therapy. The clinic is directed by Dr. David Michelson, Assistant Professor of Child Neurology.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Vagus Nerve Stimulator Clinic

Dr’s David Michelson, Standford Shu and Allison Przekop are co-directors of the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) Clinic at Children's Hospital. Through the VNS Clinic, they are responsible for treating children and young adults with medically intractable seizures who have undergone VNS implantation. Through the VNS Clinic, patients undergo rigorous evaluation to ensure that their seizures are not amenable to surgical resection. Following implantation, the patient is followed regularly in the VNS Clinic for optimizing seizure control by manipulating device settings, and when possible, weaning medications. Approximately 160 patients are regularly seen in the VNS Clinic. Teresa Serna is the clinic's nurse practitioner and may be contacted with questions.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Neurofibromatosis Clinic

Neurofibromatosis is a genetic disorder of the nervous system. The disorder affects the growth and development of nerve cell tissues, which may cause tumors to grow on the skin and bones. There are two types of neurofibromatosis. When diagnosing neurofibromatosis type I (NF I), the physician looks at changes in skin appearance, tumors, or bone abnormalities. Symptoms of NF I are commonly present at birth and certainly present by the age of 10 years old. Neurofibromatosis type II (NF II) is less common. It is characterized by tumors of the eighth cranial nerves, which affects hearing, usually in both the left and right ears. The Neurofibromatosis Clinic at LLUCH cares for both NF I and NF II patients. Dr. Stanford Shu is the clinic Director.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Pediatric Neuro-Assessment Program

The Pediatric Neuro-Assessment Program (PNAP) is a comprehensive assessment and diagnostic program developed to address the unique needs of preschool and school-aged children with academic or behavioral problems. PNAP has successfully helped over 200 children obtain necessary interventions to optimize their development and to identify etiologies of academic or behavioral concerns.

PNAP utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach that integrates neurological, psychosocial, cognitive, and neuropsychological evaluations to develop individualized treatment plans, ensure continuity of follow-up, and provide appropriate medication management.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Pediatric Stroke Clinic

The Pediatric Stroke Clinic at Children's Hospital follows children of all ages who have had acute strokes. Despite the thought that a stroke is an "old person's disease," it is not an uncommon event in children. Strokes in a child may have variable presentation and are not always recognized as a stroke.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Pediatric Chronic Pain & Headache Clinic

The Pediatric Pain Clinic offers comprehensive pain management for the pediatric patient whose life has been affected by acute and/or chronic pain. Our approach is holistic as each treatment plan is tailored to the needs of the individual patient and the family and serves to integrate body, mind, and spirit. Traditional Western medicine, along with Eastern medicine, manual medicine (Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment), group and/or family support therapy, and other treatment modalities are all utilized to maximize the potential growth and development of each child while minimizing the need for medication. We recognize that the multi-dimensional team may best serve the pediatric pain patient. Our goal is to support and serve all pediatric pain patients and not allow pain to change the course of their natural lives. This is accomplished by empowering each patient with the understanding and necessary skills to control his or her pain. Dr. Peter Prezkop provides for the evaluation and management of the pediatric patients at the Pediatric Chronic Pain & Headache Clinic.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Ketogenic Diet Clinic

The ketogenic diet has been available for more than 70 years and is most typically employed in children with medically refractory seizures. The diet involves minimizing carbohydrate and protein intake while increasing the amount of fats in the diet. This causes the body to make ketone bodies that work in the brain to help suppress seizure activity. With the assistance of a dietician, the diet must be closely monitored to ensure effectiveness. Specialized clinic staff closely monitor and guide families for optimizing the diet to maintain ketosis. Dr. David Michelson and Teresa Serna, CPNP direct the Ketogenic Diet Clinic.

For more information or to schedule an appointment, please see our contact information.

Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Clinic

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is usually considered an adult onset disease. However, about five percent of people with MS develop disease symptoms before the age of 18. Since MS is not widely recognized as a childhood disorder, diagnosis is often missed or delayed. In addition, many of its symptoms are similar to those of other pediatric neurological conditions. An estimated 8,000-10,000 children have multiple sclerosis in the United States, and another 10,000-15,000 experience disorders that may be related to MS. Children with MS can experience weakness, fatigue, numbness and tingling, vision problems, loss of balance, difficulty concentrating or remembering, and seizures. Many of these symptoms are "invisible," vary in intensity, and can come and go.
For more information, please visit out pediatric multiple sclerosis clinic page here.